Meet the LSPIRG Staff

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Karly Rath
VOLUNTEER & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT DIRECTOR - WATERLOO

Karly is a queer white settler who strives to use her privileges to show up for people. She is down to listen to ideas folks have on ways to achieve social justice, and support them in their initiatives. She is often found going for hikes or talking to people about bodily autonomy and the truth about the clitoris. Karly is also a founding member of ASCC, an LSPIRG Research and Action group that supports survivors of gendered violence. karly@lspirg.org

Jay Rideout
VOLUNTEER ENGAGEMENT & PROGRAMMING DIRECTOR - BRANTFORD
Jay is a white settler residing on the traditional territory of the Anishnawbe, Haudenosaunee, and Neutral nations (as well as on the Haldimand Tract). They identify as a Tran non-binary queer person. They are passionate about a range of social justice and environmental issues and advocate for community and relationship building as a way to move towards a more inclusive future. They are always up for some conversations on anything and everything (as ranting is a pretty solid form of self-care). jay@lspirg.org

The LSPIRG Team not only includes the above staff members, but also our Board of Directors, partners and volunteers. We are grateful to everyone in our community for making all that we do possible.

Our Mission, Vision and Values

Mission: To provide support and advocacy by and for campus and community members marginalized by systemic violence by cultivating meaningful relationships, political education, and anti-oppressive organizing

Vision: To act as a reliable support to student and community members building and sustaining movements that tear down systems of violence and replace them with equitable and just communities

Values:

Anti-Oppression - LSPIRG challenges manifestations of violence with attention to the colonial systems and ideologies that enact and perpetuate this violence. We acknowledge that our anti-oppressive organizing must dismantle the ongoing colonization of Turtle Island.

Movement Building - LSPIRG strives to meet people and their communities where they are to provide support, knowledge, and resources that build their capacity for political engagement. We engage in this difficult work because we believe in the ends we seek to achieve.

Prefigurative Politics - LSPIRG is committed to forms of organizing and personal relationship that reflect the future society we are hoping to create through our work.

Community Care - LSPIRG is responsible for responding to instances of harm from a holistic perspective that supports the individual and community while working to dismantle the conditions that precipitate them.

Self-Care - LSPIRG encourages its members to engage in behaviours and politics that validate and honour their unique subjectivity, needs, and emotional well-being.

Environmental Justice - LSPIRG aims to address the ways in which capitalism, resource extraction and colonization impact the land, air, and water. We stand for climate justice and supporting Indigenous communities and land defenders who are speaking out against the ongoing destruction.

Activism - LSPIRG provides its members with the skills to self-organize and engage in actions that advance their political objectives.

Education - LSPIRG facilitates the building of skills and political analysis among students and community members through inclusive and anti-oppressive pedagogies.

Partnerships

LSPIRG has formal partnerships with Wilfrid Laurier University, the Students’ Union and the Graduate Students’ Association, governed by Memorandums of Understanding. We also officially partner with Laurier’s Centre for Community Research, Learning and Action (CCRLA).

Plus, we have more informal partnerships like with KW Peace, the Racial Justice Network and the WLU Centre for Student Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

We partner with individuals, departments and clubs on certain projects as well, like how we collaborated with Ocean Miller, Association of Black Students Executive, in producing a film called ROOTS, about the ups and downs of being Black in predominantly white spaces.